Git Commit Games

A few years ago we were bringing on board a large group of new developers to the team. Most had a light testing background, some exposure to git and no real pairing experience. It didn’t take long to realize the number of commits on our project slowed down dramatically. Commits still happened, but they were generally large coarse grained commits with hundreds of line changes across many files.

After some gentle nudging about checking in early and often I realized the message wasn’t sticking. For the most part people waiting until they had completed a whole feature story to actually commit the code. So I figured it might be time to give things a bit of a push.

I remembered a plugin we tried out with Jenkins called the Continuous Integration Game. You got points for passing builds and adding tests and losing points for breaking the build and breaking tests. The experiment increased the testing a bit on that team, but it never really caught on. Still you have to keep on trying.

The rules were simple:

  • Every day you win by having more commits.
  • More commits in a row means you can rib you’re coworkers about it.
  • Blocking someone by committing between the time they pulled locally, merged, and ran tests was worthy of extra taunting.

Commits started picking up. After much joking commits were coming early and often. The experiment worked well enough that I wasn’t even giving feedback anymore. Early and often was the default.

Why Isn’t Remote Work Common in the Bay Area?

As working remotely especially as a developer has become easier over time, I still see a lack of any real remote work in the Bay area. Despite a very expensive living expenses, office space, and almost zero unemployment among developers, companies rarely seem to consider remote work. I assumed as the demand for developers intensified we’d see a corresponding interest in adding remote workers to teams or even going fully remote, especially with companies like 37 Signals and others paving the way.

The typical Bay area company is looking for on-site talent despite the cost and difficulty of recruiting. With over 20 years of experience now I acknowledge it’s nice to have a team co-located, but certainly not at the expense of having a good team. There are some incidental communication and collaboration benefits of working side by side in a room with a team, but many of these same benefits can be mimicked using technology. Some of the tools that are commonplace, cheap, or free are:

  • Remote Pairing Tools (ScreenHero, tmux, VNC, Skype in a pinch)
  • Hosted Project Trackers (Pivotal, Trello)
  • Source Control with built in Code Reviews (github, gutbucket)
  • Issue Trackers (ZenDesk, Redline)
  • Video Calls (Skype)
  • Shared chat platforms (Slack, HipChat, Campfire)

So why are we still largely living in the working experiences of the 1990s?

Hiring In 2015 Is Hard

More than a year ago we lost a good engineer to a new opportunity. I knew that engineer would be hard to replace, but I did not expect to still be trying to hire a replacement a year later. I haven’t seen this sort of tight market for developers since the height of the dotcom boom more than 15 years ago.

We’ve had trouble at multiple stages in the recruiting process. We’ve had trouble getting a good funnel, we simply don’t have many candidates. We have a robust interviewing process for Sacramento, but probably simpler than the process many Bay area startups use. And more and more we’ve had people decide to turn us down before and even after offers. One person simply emailed us to let us know just before an interview that “it wouldn’t be in either of our best interests” to conduct the final interview. Others have let us know that our business just doesn’t have enough of world changing mission.

I’ve also seen more candidates describing themselves as architects. Almost all of them have turned out to be more in the range of mid-level developers. There was a similar overstating of skills when the last dotcom started sucking up anyone who could spell HTML.

I don’t have any solutions to our year long hiring failure, but it’s time for us to try something different.

Lunch for Integrating Teams

Lunch is a funny thing for many developers. With a tendency towards introverts often people get into habits of eating alone either with food from home or just running out to pick something up and bring it back. Lunch as a social outing is a bit unusual and unexpected.

I’ve viewed eating with others as one of my favorite parts of the working day for a long time. Even when I work remote I often schedule lunches with former colleagues or friends to keep up with them. At my present gig I work in the office Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays. Tuesdays are a company sponsored team lunch which has been a great way to get everyone out eating together. Mondays and Thursdays I typically get a bite with another one of our developer teams. I enjoy the conversations and it’s a free way to keep up with another team and explain what’s going on with our project. I know there’s a small cost involved in eating out, but it’s only two days a week and far outweighed by sharing knowledge across the organization. And I do like to get out of the office.

So if as a developer you tend towards the lunch from home and eating at your desk, try out lunch out with some co-workers at least once a week. It’s a cheap experiment and a great way keep up with your organization.

Phone Screening Junior Candidates


Phone screening junior candidates is hard. With 20+ years of experience I find it hard to evaluate someone who’s new to the field or worked less than 6 months. What I’m looking for is potential, but I can’t fall back on traditional measures where I ask for evidence of a skill. Sure they might have a beginning grasp of some language or the ability to put together a bare bones web site or iPhone app, but I really can’t drill them on OO, Domain Driven Design, or functional programming.

My approach has been to touch on some real basics to determine they’ve at least been exposed to subjects they claim on a recipe. Then I dig for stories of how they picked things up, what they learned from mistakes

Step one, is read the resume. They tend to actually be one page! Note anything I should ask them about such as basic language syntax or their explanation of TDD. Second, is take a look at any open source code you can find, often github. Ignore that it’s sloppy or untested and just take a good look at it. Then if you have time you can do some Googling and see what kind of data you can find about their participation in the community or even just questions on forums or Stack Overflow.

Next comes the actual phone screen itself. I have a stable of questions I use, a few I always use and many that I sample based on the interviewee’s experience:

  • What have you done in 2 minutes or less? (I’ll let this go over 2 minutes if I’m getting good information, but sometimes you just have to tell people you need to move onto the next question.)
  • I usually warm up with a question about the disadvantages of inheritance. This often throws junior candidates, but you can get a pretty good sense of how much OO they really understand this early in a career.
  • As I’m a die-hard TDD/BDD type I always ask them to describe how they’d write a test in their current unit test framework. A surprising number of resumes that claim to practice TDD can’t explain the syntax behind writing a rspec or Junit test.
  • I’ll often ask a question about a situation where they didn’t have enough information to complete an assignment and how they handled that. Sometimes this sort of behavioral question throws junior developers and I have to reiterate that I’m not looking for a theoretical answer.
  • Then I’ll jump around from behavioral questions to technical questions. I might ask about what an index is or what they find most challenging about their current project.
  • Almost always I include a question on how they come up to speed on new technologies. I’m looking here for anything they learned that wasn’t just presented to them in a class or at their job.
  • Finally I wrap up with a few standard questions:

  • Why do you want to work for us?
  • Is there anything else I should ask you?
  • What questions do you have for me?

Every few months I come through the questions and usually add a few and remove the ones I never ask. I still wish I had a better process, but the most common theme to come out of junior phone screens is that they’re enthusiastic and they know at least what they claim on the resume.